Studio 54, New Year’s Eve 1978, shot by Tod Papageorge (via)

Happy happy!


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“And so the national enigma: a country that is easily the best-run, least-corrupt and most progressive on the African continent, run by a man who sees human rights defenders as trying to reassert the old patronising, finger-wagging and, frankly, racist relationships of the past.”

—Peter Greste at Al Jazeera, on the national enigma that is Rwanda

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Pictures taken by the Google Street View van. From top: Utsira, Norway; Sao Joao Del Rei, Brazil; Inverallochy, Scotland; Prejmer, Romania; Saint Nicolas De La Grave, France; Capetown, South Africa. (via)


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“Five Girls Walking, Upper East Side Manhattan” (1981) by Steven Landis for Norma Kamali’s “Sweats” line (via)


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Wendy MacNaughton's shoebox-size scale replica of her art school apartment, made when she was living there. Made of balsa, bass, and wood glue.


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Ohhh my goodness, plush NPR hosts by Heidi Kenney. On the left are Robert Krulwich & Jad Abumrad from Radiolab; on the right is Ira Glass from TAL.

(Source: mypapercrane.com)

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"Forever Bicycles" by Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei (via The Big Picture's feature on bikes)

(Source: Boston.com)

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Haruki Murakami Bingo by Grant Snider for Sunday’s New York Times Book Review.

(via, via)


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I’m wide awake it’s morning by Ekaterina Khozatskaya (via)


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Kapijmpanga by Viviane Sassen, 2005 (via)


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News coverage of Quebec almost always focuses on division: English vs. French; Quebec-born vs. immigrant; etc. This is the narrative that has shaped how people see us as a province, whether or not it is fair. But this is not what I feel right now when I walk down the street. At 8pm, I rush out of the house with a saucepan and a ladle, and as I walk to meet my fellow protesters, I hear people emerge from their balconies and the music starts. If you do not live here, I wish I could properly convey to you what it feels like; the above video is a start. It is magic. It starts quietly, a suggestion here and there, and it builds. Everybody on the street begins to smile. I get there, and we all—young and old, children and students and couples and retirees and workers and weird misfits and dogs and, well, neighbours—we all grin the widest grins you have ever seen while dancing around and making as much noise as possible. We are almost ecstatic with the joy of letting loose like this, of voicing our resistance to a government that seeks to silence us, and of being together like this.

—from “An Open Letter to the Mainstream English Media” by translatingtheprintempserable


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From the Smiling Victorians Flickr group. Not all old photos are grim & glum!

(Source: flickr.com)

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Fuse by Wim Botha, 2011

(Source: stevenson.info)

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“It is what the internet lures out of us—hubris, daydreams, avarice, obsessions—that makes it so potent and so volatile. TV’s power is serenely impervious; it does all the talking, and we can only listen or turn it off. But the internet is at least partly us; we write it as well as read it, perform for it as well as watch it, create it as well as consume it. Watching TV is a solitary activity that feels like a communal one, while the internet is a communal experience masquerading as solitude.”

Laura Miller, discussing “how novels came to terms with the internet”

(via , via)


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Street art by BR1 (via)


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Siva Vijenthira

“You’ll like her. She’s, like, really into the internet.” —how a coworker once described me to a boss.

Other things I’m into: Toronto, design, social advocacy, intersectional identity, scientific literacy, puns.

I started this Tumblr five years ago, under a pseudonym, to teach myself HTML and CSS. It made me some friends and helped me land at least one job, but I don't come on here so much anymore.

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